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Universal Self – A Multi Media Theater Production

Written & Performed by Kilusan Bautista

Table of Contents:

1. Fall 2011 Press Release

2. Published Article in Fil-Am Ako

3. Radio Interview in Silicon Valley Debug

4. Radio Interview on WBAI 99.5 FM (March 2010)

5. Radio Interview on WBAI 99.5 FM (May 2010)

6. Letter of Recommendation: Micki Altiveros, Smithsonian Folk Life Festival 2010

7. Letter of Recommendation: CUNY Law School, LALSA

8. Letter of Recommendation: Dr. Siri Brown

9. Published blog: Stonehill College (Inter-Cultural Affairs Department)

10.Asian American Artist Alliance – June E-newsletter

11.Published blog: Chili Arts Salon

12.Audience Letter: Jennifer Lau, CA

13.Audience Letter: Anthony Del Rosario, CA

14.Published Article in Urban Crazes Magazine

15.Published Article in Poor Magazine

16. TheFilAm.Net

17. GMA Network

18. Iwilla Remedy

19. Abs-Cbn News

20. Village Voice

21. Asian Journal

22. Culture Str/ke

23. FringeNYC Commercial with Joe Bataan

24. FringeNYC Commercial

25. The One Festival NYC Commercial

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1. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

What happens when Manny Pacquaio takes off his boxing gloves?  What happens when the Jabbawockeez take off their masks?  What happens when the Invisible Scratch Pickles, Beat Junkies & 5th Platoon pack up their turntables after rocking a party?  What happens when Arnel Pineda of Journey puts down the microphone?

These iconic Filipino/Filipino Americans go home and live their lives.  The contemporary Filipino and Filipino American experience is a renaissance journey filled with incredible talent, tremendous struggle and resilient hard work.  Yes, we are in the process of reclaiming our authentic artistic expressions and defining our own legacy!

Welcome to the moment where we can be completely free, where we can kick off our time traveling shoes, put to rest our Lapu Lapu shield of historical protection and bury the eskinol skin whitening, soul crushing centuries of colonial tears.  Welcome to the post-modern-technological world of being a “Universal Filipino.”

On September 23rd, 24th & 25th, 2011, at the Historic Nuyorican Poets Cafe, NY, NY, audiences will experience the return of a Hip Hop Theater Production entitled, “UNIVERSAL FILIPINO”.  Written and performed by Kilusan Bautista, a Bay Area, CA raised and New York City based performance artist.   With special artistic direction by Lia McPherson, a Brooklyn based performance artist.

“UNIVERSAL FILIPINO” cultivates the artistic aesthetics of Hip Hop Theater, Spoken Word Poetry, Emceeing and Interpretive Movement to offer a creative and cutting edge presentation.  There is a battle underway deep within our minds and souls.  “UNIVERSAL FILIPINO” is a new solo Hip Hop Theater production that brings to life the internal battles for Americanized children of immigrant parents.  During his youth, Kilusan is haunted by a historic hater who wishes to destroy his self-esteem by influencing him into a helpless, violent and psychologically troubled state of existence.  Malakas is an ancestral guardian spirit who exists to guide Kilusan in remembering his true self worth and connection to his people.  It is now up to Kilusan to make the right choices as a youth of color in urban, working class America.  Shall he fall victim to the statistics of growing up in a “high risk” environment, polluted with drugs, violence and crime?  Or shall Kilusan find his Destiny and live a life that possesses knowledge of self?

Set within the 1980’s and 1990’s, Bay Area, CA,  “UNIVERSAL FILIPINO” will take audiences on a journey of struggle and redemption.  The challenge for youth of color in America is not just black and white.  The stories for Americanized, so called “2nd generation”, children of immigrant parents are continuing to surface as a reminder of the need to balance, validate and make sense of all the cultural world’s represented in one’s identity.  Are you ready to experience a thought provoking, ‘Edu-tainment’ reality that brings you closer to the universal family living room?

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2) Published article in Fil-Am Ako:*Oct 12th, 2010*

Click here for online link

“Indigenous warrior, oh warrior, I summon thee. Raise your voice to the sky and walk with pride.”

It’s not in every production, in which one hears the singing evocation of the Filipino indigenous past; which later turns into a bumpin’ dance number rousing the spirit of Tupac Shakur’s California. But Jeremy “Kilusan” Bautista does just that.

In “Universal Filipino” Bautista gives a coming-of-age Filipino American story a modern twist as a solo hip-hop theater production.  He uses hip hop, dance, interpretive movement and spoken word to take us on a whirlwind trip to his youth in the Bay Area and the Philippines. He portrays a myriad of characters from his past, including a father fallen into addiction and a young Bautista coming to grips with being an American-born Filipino, drug and alcohol abuse in the family, gangs, street life and, of course, his love for hip hop.

He connects the subconscious with reality by weaving family wisdom with the historical and indigenous facets of the Philippines. His spiritual representations of his inner struggle between good and evil include the folkloric character Malakas and the Hater, Bautista’s creation that likely embodies the negative effects of imperialism in the Philippines.

“I wanted to tell my story as a Filipino-American who is in a process of reclaiming his history and culture,” says Bautista. “So these ideas with the character of Malakas or the Hater, it’s like a historic battle that’s being played out in the spirit-world and that influences our every day reality. As an artist, I question where do these things come from. The only way I could make sense out of it is to incorporate them within my play.”

“Universal Filipino” is heavy with content, but with musical direction by his live deejay and sound engineer, Tyson Dai, also known as DJ Soulcrates, he makes it work into a one-man play.

Bautista is no stranger to performing. His resume is packed with spoken word and hip hop theater experiences in the Bay Area, including being a core member of 8th Wonder, a Filipino spoken-word group. He wrote and directed “A Tuyo in the Sun,” a story of three generations of his family’s immigration from the Philippines to the United States in 2002 at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he attended.

Bautista started writing “Universal Filipino” in 2005, but after a breakup in 2009 he focused his energy on making his piece into a full-scale production. That’s when he moved to New York.

It’s never easy to break into the New York arts scene, but Bautista was determined. He reunited with Dai, who was already in the Big Apple and whom he worked with while they were in Santa Cruz. A televised Manny Pacquiao fight in the Upper West Side serendipitously brought them together. He also searched the five boroughs for spaces to showcase his play until he found Rebel Diaz Arts Collective, a community arts group in the Bronx. At Rebel Diaz, he collaborated with Yuisa Dávila and premiered two full performances of “Universal Filipino.”

His current team of creatives comprises himself, Dai and dance choreographers Jeffrey Kairi Bautista and Lia McPherson. With his group, he plans on evolving his play as he takes it to the next level of full-length performances all over New York, with Broadway being the pinnacle.

As much as “Universal Filipino” is his own story, it also tries to reveal and empower those who’ve shared a working-class struggle, Filipino or not. Bautista says he is inspired by justice and believes his personal interactions with the community are all political.

“I’m challenged by the idea of justice and to really embody somebody that wants to fight for equal rights for a better type of world to live in,” he says. “I want to be a part of this movement that’s really working toward the progression of the human spirit.”

“Universal Filipino” has already taken Bautista to a variety of venues this past summer. In Washington, D.C., he performed excerpts at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall with Sulu DC, an Asian American and Pacific Islander American arts collective in the D.C.-area. In New York, it was at the Bowery Poetry Club in downtown Manhattan with Sulu Series NYC and in front of a group of domestic workers affiliated with Ugnayan, a New York-area Filipino youth organization. Bautista even performed at an incoming freshman class at Yale University.

“I was kinda going through like a process of questioning if they would receive it well,” he says. “But again, you know, I think when you bring out your heart and you really give something people can think about, it doesn’t matter what audience it is. It’ll resonate.”

And it did.

“I was able to talk to this one Dominican brother…He came up to me and was just like, ‘Yo, man, you told my story,’” reminisces Bautista. “He grew up here in the Bronx and now he’s going to Yale, first generation in his family to go to college. This is his first couple of days at Yale University, just feeling alienated. For me to come up there just to share my story within a collegiate level was just, yo, I feel validated. I feel I have a place here.”

Although his piece represents a universal theme of struggle, his family and their story in this play are still central to Bautista. His father, in particular, is still influential.

“I think about his struggles when he asks himself, ‘Is it all worth it? Is it worth continuing to fight for?’” he contemplates. “For him, even though I don’t agree with his ways or the decisions that he makes, his goal is to support his family. His goal is to maintain a home so that my family and the generations to follow have something here in America. I take that example, and then I magnify that within what I’m doing here in New York City.”

And when his aunt and uncle from California came to see him perform with Sulu DC for the first time, Bautista said his uncle was moved by the memories in “Universal Filipino.”

“My uncle was joking around, talking about how he was going to relapse to drinking again because he used to have a bad alcohol problem,” he says. “But what touched me was that he was about to cry…after the show. I could see him pacing back and forth, and he was looking left and right. He was like…‘You touched me, you know?’ I hope I got him to the point where he doesn’t drink again!”

About the Guest Writer: Katya “Kat” Lucero is a Washington, D.C.-based writer. She hails from Chicago, but she is writing, drinking, eating and groovin’ her way through the nation’s capital… and the three- to four-hour ride to the Empire State of Mind.


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3. Radio Interview:*April 29, 2011
Silicon Valley Debug Magazine

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4. Radio Interview:*March 16, 2010
Asia Pacific Forum: WBAI FM 99.5

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5. Radio Interview:*May 25, 2010
Asia Pacific Forum: WBAI FM 99.5

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6. Letter of Recommendation:*SEPTEMBER 16, 2010*

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

SINCE THE 1970ʼS, I HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN THE PERFORMING ARTS AS DANCER, AS ARTS ADMINISTRATOR WITHIN A LARGE UNIVERSITY, CULTURAL FESTIVALS THROUGH THE YEARS AND MOST RECENTLY AS ASSISTANT PARTICIPANT STAFF COORDINATOR FOR THIS YEARʼS 44TH ANNUAL SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL. IT WAS IN THIS ROLE THAT I FIRST SAW KILUSAN BAUTISTA PERFORM HIS UNIVERSAL FILIPINO, SPONSORED BY SULU DC*, IN A SMALL VENUE IN DC LAST SPRING.

KILUSANʼS ONE-MAN PERFORMANCE OF UNIVERSAL FILIPINO HAD THE HOUSE SPELLBOUND. KILUSAN LOOMED LARGE, SEAMLESSLY SLIPPING THROUGH VARIOUS CHARACTERS IN A TIME LINE OF PHILIPPINE HISTORY THROUGH THE EXPERIENCE OF ONE FAMILY– ALL THE WAY TO IMMIGRANTSʼ EXPERIENCE HERE IN AMERICA. HIS THOUGHT PROVOKING PLAY WAS ONLY MAGNIFIED EVEN FURTHER ON THAT SMALL STAGE BY HIS DYNAMISM. THOUGH SMALL IN STATURE, HE IS A POWERHOUSE OF PHYSICAL DEFT, GRACE AND AGILITY. HE SOARED THAT NIGHT ON THIS SMALL STAGE AND TRANSPORTED THE AUDIENCE WITH HIM.

THIS YEAR WAS THE FIRST TIME THE ANNUAL SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL (44TH) CELEBRATED THE ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN THIS COUNTRY. NOT ONLY WAS KILUSANʼS PLAY SO APPROPRIATE FOR THE THEMES THIS FESTIVAL EXPLORED: CULTURAL IDENTITY, TRANSITIONING TO A NEW CULTURE – UNIVERSAL FILIPINOʼS THEMES ARE TIMELESS AND PERHAPS EVEN MORE SIGNIFICANT TODAY. KILUSANʼS PERFORMANCE AT THE SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL DID NOT DISAPPOINT. THE FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL SEES ONE MILLION VISITORS THROUGH ITS 10-DAY SPAN AND ON THAT DAY, HIS PLAY REACHED A BROAD SPECTRUM OF CITIZENS AND HELD THEM SPELLBOUND TO HIS FASCINATING PORTRAYALS IN UNIVERSAL FILIPINO. I WAS PARTICULARLY PLEASED THAT HE COULD PLAY IN A LARGE VENUE, BUT WAS EVEN MORE IMPRESSED WITH THAT RARE ABILITY HE HAS TO REALLY CONNECT WITH HIS AUDIENCES AND TRANSPORT THEM THROUGHOUT THIS PLAY.

KILUSAN IS AN OUTSTANDING PERFORMER WHO WILL TAKE HIS ARTISTRY TO NEW LEVELS. IT WILL BE FASCINATING TO WATCH HIS EVOLVEMENT AS PERFORMER, SPOKEN WORD ARTIST, PLAYWRIGHT AND DIRECTOR. I AM SO PLEASED AND HONORED TO WRITE ON HIS BEHALF AND HIGHLY RECOMMEND KILUSAN BAUTISTA. I THINK HIS PERSONAL AND ARTISTIC GROWTH THROUGH HIS ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE CERTAINLY IS A BIG PART OF HIS ARTISTRY BUT I BELIEVE HE IS ALSO A VISIONARY WHO WILL BRING HIS DYNAMIC TALENT AND INSIGHT TO WHATEVER HE APPLIES HIS HAND TO.

PLEASE CONTACT ME IF I CAN PROVIDE FURTHER INFORMATION.

SINCERELY,

MICKI ALTIVEROS
ASSISTANT PARTICIPANT STAFF COORDINATOR
[APRIL-JULY 2010]
ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICANS: LOCAL LIVES, GLOBAL TIES
SMITHSONIAN FOLKLIFE FESTIVAL 2010

*SULU DC – SULU DC IS AN UNDERGROUND, GRASSROOTS NETWORK FOR ASIAN AMERICAN AND/OR PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN (AAPI)* ARTISTS, WHICH PROVIDES A HOME FOR AAPI FOCUSED SPOKEN WORD AND MULTIDISCIPLINARY ARTISTS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

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7. Letter of Recommendation:*DECEMBER 23, 2010*

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN,

WE ARE WRITING TO EXPRESS OUR WHOLEHEARTED SUPPORT OF MR. KILUSAN BAUTISTA’S “UNIVERSAL FILIPINO” HIP-HOP THEATRE PERFORMANCE. MR. BAUTISTA WAS INVITED AS THE FEATURED ARTIST BY THE CUNY LAW SCHOOL’S LATIN AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION TO PARTAKE IN OUR SPEAKER SERIES TITLED “CAFE CON LECHE.” THE CAFE CON LECHE SERIES OCCURS ONCE A SEMESTER AND EACH FOCUSES ON A DIFFERENT TOPIC, WHICH WE FEEL EXEMPLIFIES A PARTICULARLY PRESSING ISSUE WITHIN POOR AND IMMIGRANT COMMUNITIES. THIS YEAR, THE 2010-2011 EXECUTIVE BOARD HELD A SERIES DEVOTED TO THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ARTISTIC EXPRESSION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE STRUGGLES WITHIN THESE COMMUNITIES. THIS EVENT WAS TITLED “UNIFIC-ARTE” AND IT EXPLORED THE WAY IN WHICH ARTISTS ARE USING THESE FORMS OF EXPRESSION TO PROPEL OR SUPPORT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. IN ORDER TO ACHIEVE THAT GOAL, WE INVITED ARTISTS TO PERFORM AND SHOWCASE THEIR ART FORM.

MR. BAUTISTA WAS ASKED TO PERFORM AN EXCERPT OF UNIVERSAL FILIPINO BECAUSE WE BELIEVED IT EXEMPLARY TO THIS VISION. IN A TIME IN THE UNITED STATES OF INCREASING HATE AND XENOPHOBIA, UNIVERSAL FILIPINO, IN AN HONEST AND UNASSUMING MANNER, CAPTURES THE JOURNEY TOWARD SELF-DISCOVERY BY ETHNIC AND CULTURAL MINORITIES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. KILSUAN’S IDENTITY WAS INFLUENCED NOT MERELY BY HIS FILIPINO HERITAGE, BUT BY THE VIBRANT MULTICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT HE WAS SURROUNDED BY WHILE GROWING UP IN THE BAY AREA. UNIVERSAL FILIPINO, THROUGH THE EYES OF FILIPINO-AMERICAN MAN, PROVIDES INSIGHT INTO THE WAY MULTICULTURAL GROUPS IN AMERICA SHAPE AND INFLUENCE EACH OTHER, AND AS THE TITLE ITSELF SUGGESTS, IT CAPTURES THE UNIVERSALITY OF THE STRUGGLE TO RECLAIM THEIR CULTURE.

UNIVERSAL FILIPINO BLENDS A THEATRICAL PERFORMANCE WITH PENETRATING RHYTHMS AND SOUNDS TO CREATE AN ENTIRE SOCIO-HISTORICAL NARRATIVE COVERING NATIVE AND IMMIGRANT MUSICAL INSPIRATIONS. IN THE FABRIC OF HIS ARTWORK, MR. KILUSAN HAS REACHED INTO THE MAGICAL AND RICH WORLD OF HIS FILIPINO ANCESTRY TO BRING TO THE FOREFRONT OF THE STAGE, DRUMS AND JUNGLE BEATS THAT CREATE A TIGHTLY WOVEN LANDSCAPE OF DREAMS. WITHIN THIS DREAM STATE FORM OF HIS NATIVE CULTURE, MR. KILUSAN ADDS DEPTH AND MODERNITY TO HIS ARTISTIC CREATION BY BLENDING THE EXPLOSIVE SOUNDS OF HIP-HOP. UNIVERSAL FILIPINO IS UNIQUE IN THAT IT GRASPS THAT INTANGIBLE BUT RELENTLESS SPIRIT OF INDIGENOUS CULTURE, TO FORGE IT WITH THE BOLDLY SUBVERSIVE FORCE OF HIP-HOP. IN THE END, THE DANCE, THE THEATRE, THE MUSIC, AND THE SPOKEN WORD ALL COME TOGETHER TO ENGAGE IN CRITICAL COMMENTARY ON THE DUAL EXPERIENCE OF THE IMMIGRANT IN THE UNITED STATES. ABOVE ALL, UNIVERSAL FILIPINO REFUSES TO ACCEPT THE PERPETUAL INVISIBILITY ASSIGNED TO IMMIGRANTS WHILE CALLING OUT FOR UNITY AND SOLIDARITY IN THE STRUGGLES OF OPPRESSED PEOPLE.

AS INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE STUDYING THE LAW IN ORDER TO BECOME STRONGER AND BETTER ARMED ADVOCATES FOR OPPRESSED PEOPLES IN THE UNITED STATES AND OVER THE WORLD, WE WERE DEEPLY MOVED BY THE BEAUTY AND SINCERITY IN WHICH MR. KILUSAN BROUGHT UNITY TO THOSE STRUGGLES. MANY OF US ARE ALSO IMMIGRANTS OR CHILDREN OF IMMIGRANTS WHO SAW PART OF OURSELVES IN KILUSAN, AS INDIVIDUALS WHO CARRY THE INNER-STRUGGLE TO RECLAIM OUR NATIVE AND INDIGENOUS CULTURE ALONG WITH OUR AMERICAN UPBRINGING. WE BELIEVE THAT MR. KILUSAN’S WORK TRANSCENDS LANGUAGE AND CULTURE AND CREATES A WORLD WHERE ALL THOSE STRUGGLING WITH ALL FORMS OF OPPRESSION AS WELL AS CULTURAL ACCEPTANCE, WILL UNDOUBTEDLY FIND SOLIDARITY IN UNIVERSAL FILIPINO.

SHOULD YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING OUR SUPPORT OF MR. KILUSAN’S UNIVERSAL FILIPINO, PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CONTACT US DIRECTLY.

SINCERELY,

CUNY LATIN AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION:

VERONICA JOYA
PRESIDENT

ANTHONY POSADA
VICE-PRESIDENT

LILI BIESEMEYER
TREASURER

MARIO VARGAS
SECRETARY

KENNY MINAYA
PROGRAM COORDINATOR

KELLY MARIE FAY RODRIGUEZ
RACE & PRIVILEGE COORDINATOR

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8. Letter of Recommendation:*SEPTEMBER 5, 2010*

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

“WHERE AFRICAN CENTERED SCHOLARSHIP AND COMMUNITY ACTIVISM UNITE”

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

WITHOUT HESITATION, I FULLY RECOMMEND KILUSAN BAUTISTA FOR ANY PROGRAMMING AND THEATRICAL WORKS PERTAINING TO CULTURE, IDENTITY AND/OR GRASSROOTS COMMUNITY ORGANIZING. I HAVE KNOWN MR. BAUTISTA FOR OVER THREE (3) YEARS AS A COMMUNITY ORGANIZER, EDUCATOR AND PERFORMANCE ARTIST IN THE BAY AREA. MR. BAUTISTA HAS A DEEP LEVEL OF COMMITMENT TO THE TRANSFORMATIVE AND EMPOWERING IMPACT POLITICAL AND CULTURAL PERFORMANCE HAS UPON THE AUDIENCE. HIS PERFORMANCES ALWAYS RECEIVE RAVE REVIEWS AND OFFER THE AUDIENCE INSIGHT INTO THE WORLD OF YOUNG FILIPINO AMERICANS.

IN ADDITION, MR. BAUTISTA HAS GREAT CHARACTER, COMMITMENT AND INTEGRITY. HIS DEDICATION IS SINCERE AND HIS AIM TO PERFORM AND ORGANIZE AT THE BEST LEVEL ALWAYS PUSHES HIM TO GIVE HIS BEST WORK. IN ADDITION, MR. BAUTISTA WORKS VERY WELL WITH AN ARRAY OF PEOPLE AND IS EFFECTIVE AT MAKING CONNECTIONS AND BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER.

IF I MAY BE OF ANY FURTHER ASSISTANCE IN RECOMMENDING JEREMY BAUTISTA, PLEASE CONTACT ME DIRECTLY.

SINCERELY,

SIRI BROWN, PH.D.
MERRITT COLLEGE, OAKLAND, CA
CHAIR OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
PROF. OF AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

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9. Published blog from audience members:*April 11, 2011*
Stonehill College – Inter Cultural Affairs Blog

Reflections from Randall Phyall
Uniquely Me, Universally Us

Several weeks ago, I attended a program sponsored by the Hip-Hop Club which featured Kilusan Bautista. Currently based in New York, Kilusan is a highly respected actor, director, educator, cultural writer and community organizer. His production entitled “Universal Filipino,” touches on themes ranging from drug addiction to “identity politics.” Kilusan, whose stage name means “movement,” depicted very vivid experiences living as a Filipino-American through Hip-Hop Theater, spoken word, and martial arts. His story, though uniquely his, had many universal components to it.

Kilusan’s performance caused me to reflect on multiple aspects of my own upbringing. Specifically, he reminded me that even seemingly insignificant phenomena in our lives play a role in how we develop our identities. Often times, we run so fast in life that we forget about those who were walking alongside of us. We minimize the magnitude of experiences (both negative and positive), events, and people that shaped and continue to shape who we are as person. If we take the time to pause and reflect on life, we can even trace certain characteristics back to our cultural traditions and values practiced in our households. However, what resonated with me the most came during the question and answer section of Kilusan’s performance. When discussing his purpose and motivation for his work he referred to his “sweat…as self-work.” It made me really think about the fact that we all have to bear the weight of loss, struggle, despair, and insecurity. However, as we “unpack” many of us find ourselves adopting a victim’s mentality; a mindset that creates an expectation that things will always go wrong. It is a very crippling complex, which leaves many feeling powerless and vulnerable. As Kilusan can attest, the solution is self-empowerment; embracing one’s circumstances then reclaiming and exercising your ability to choose how you respond to them. According to author and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl, “Everything can be taken from a man or a woman but one thing: the last of human freedoms to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

As Kilusan put it, we must figure out how to “turn your experiences into power.” However, I believe many people (myself included) struggle with discovering what power looks like for them. For Kilusan, uses various art forms to not only share his experiences, but to empower others along the way. I believe that an individual’s purpose in life is as unique as the circumstances by which they realize it. The medium through which I share my experiences is “uniquely me.” However, the project of turning them into power, thus creating purpose in life, is “universally us.” Power is progress. Power is growth. Power is freedom.

Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. Viktor Frankl

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10. Asian American Artist Alliance – *June 14, 2011*
June 2011 E-Newsletter

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11. Published blog: *May 9, 2010*
Chili Arts Salon

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12. Audience Letter: *April 23, 2011*

Hi Kilusan,

I’m Jen Espeleta’s friend, who got to see your show at La Pena last night. I just wanna say again, that you were amazing! You are so talented and free with your words, movement and expression. The unique way you tell the story of your life hit deeps and is something the world who gets to experience your living piece of art an everlasting memory, a deeper understanding, and something to really talk about.

I found myself tripping out with almost everything you acted out, from gaffling, gangbanging, tagging, breakdancing, bay area hip hop, being surrounded with but staying away from drugs, family, church, and even martial arts and eskrima! I know that life. I grew up next to that life. That’s my boy’s life. All of it.

What you’re doing with your life and passion is truly inspirational and I hope the world gets to know you and gets motivated to find themselves and their voices as you have found yours.

Sincerely,

JenniferLau

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13. Audience Letter: *April 24, 2011*

Hello Kilusan –

Wanted to thank you for a spectacular performance last night of Universal Filipino at the De-Bug Community Center in San Jose.  Like yourself I am a first generation Filipino-American who had challenges, specifically with my father, growing-up.  Also like yourself I had no adult man, that looked like me, to learn from and “see” how a boy becomes a man.  Earning my identity, and self worth, didn’t come easy or early.  In my 30s I found myself divorced and alone.  With no family to turn to and a society that looked very different from me and, many times, mocked my intelligence, my journey of discovery began.
Today I am neither American nor Filipino (or at least I don’t identify with either exclusively).  Rather, I’m a guy who speaks English fluently, understands Tagalog somewhat, and looks like a Chinese guy that’s brownish.  My only accent is that of middle-America, i.e. I don’t speak like a black person or Latino and don’t understand why a lot of Filipino-Americans choose to dress, walk and talk like someone who they’re not and which make them less valuable in the workforce.  Yeah, I know, I’m conforming to the capitalistic imperialism as a slave to the mostly White bourgeoise but I’ve got a plan to break away and we all need to do the same rather than force the majority to accept us simply because we live here.  Use the machine rather than being used by the machine (easier said than done).
Keep up the great work and I look forward to your next tour in the Bay.
Regards,
Anthony Del Rosario
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14.Published Article in Urban Crazes: *June 13, 2011*
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15. Published Article in Poor Magazine: *August 3, 2011*
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19.  Abs-Cbn News:
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23. FringeNYC Commercial with Joe Bataan
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24. FringeNYC Commercial
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25. The One Festival NYC Commercial
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